On the Subject of MacTel Compatibility…

2006
Apr
20

Apple: Jump. Apple Fans: Anything for you, Steve! Who do you want us to land on? As you can plainly see in the discussion here and here, as well as a hundred other blogs, forums, and bulletin boards around the Web, the zealous Macintosh fan base is quick to accuse Adobe, Microsoft, and other Mac [...]

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Apple: Jump. Apple Fans: Anything for you, Steve! Who do you want us to land on?

As you can plainly see in the discussion here and here, as well as a hundred other blogs, forums, and bulletin boards around the Web, the zealous Macintosh fan base is quick to accuse Adobe, Microsoft, and other Mac software makers of intentionally dragging their feet in porting applications to the new Intel-based Mac Universal Binary code. In other words: the market is once again jumping at Apple’s command.

Adobe has announced that Creative Suite 3, due out in the first or second quarter of 2007, will run natively on Intel-based Macs (commonly referred to as “MacTels”), but that the work involved in the porting of its code will be too extensive to migrate current versions of its Creative Suite applications. Microsoft, Corel, and other publishers of large Mac software titles have made similar announcements. As a result, a large portion of the Mac fanbase has turned on those software makers, completely and intentionally ignoring the company truly responsible.

Everytime Apple comes up with a great idea (and they specialize in truly great ideas) and keeps it secret from partners, Apple accomplishes it’s goal of manipulating the market. Apple CEO Steve Jobs believes in creating demand before anyone can satisfy the supply. It’s a time honored strategy with several great success stories–PlayStation 2, Tickle Me Elmo, and Mac Mini, just to name a few. By announcing and shipping MacTel PowerBook Pro and iMac systems before partners have had time to work with the new processor chip and code layer, Jobs knows that he’ll get market consumers drooling over new MacTels long before software makers can update their products and actually make the MacTels usable to Apple’s core markets.

Whereas Sony created more demand than supply with its PlayStation 2 game console by (allegedly) limiting the manufacturing supply, there’s no need for Apple to be so blatant. Apple can build all the MacTel units it likes because Jobs knows his computers are all but useless without third-party software. Apple’s partners will be the apparent cause of demand outweighing supply. Therefore, it’s they who will take the heat for it, not Apple. It’s a win-win for Apple: They create a buzz and demand for their product, which translates into certain sales now or later, and they inspire consumer bad will toward companies like Adobe and Microsoft–companies that represent threats to Apple’s expanding and increasingly competitive interests.

Steve Jobs is, without question, one of the most brilliant visionaries of our time. He produces amazing ideas wherefrom grow amazing products with impeccable timing. But Steve Jobs is also a brilliant business shark. Ever since his famous “1984″ advertising campaign that launched the Apple Macintosh and an ongoing campaign of painting Apple’s then- and later-competition as the Evil Empire, Jobs and Apple have deftly manipulated the perceptions of computer consumers.

Jobs is a master at manipulating people into reviling Apple’s competitors–justified or not. And zealous Mac fans happily suspend critical thought to swarm any target at which Apple points. Major Mac software publishers are only the latest quarry for Apple’s dextrous and mighty misdirection machine.

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5 Responses Discussing “On the Subject of MacTel Compatibility…”
  1. I’ve been saying this since the introduction of OS9, after every change, drivers of large brandname equipment wouldn’t work anymore and usually it took some time for an update of those drivers
    Even in point updates thing are so drastically changed that software has to be re-written

    #1
    20 Apr 2006
    23:54 PT
  2. Well, I for one don’t mind. We’ve all got G5′s here and they’ll do just fine. CS2 came out really fast after CS1. If you’ve got about 30 licences you would not mind either.

    #2
    21 Apr 2006
    08:08 PT
  3. Good point, Woz!

    #3
    21 Apr 2006
    12:06 PT
  4. Hey, Pariah,

    Don Fluckinger of PDFZone has written an article with similar thoughts:

    Acrobat Users, You’re Lucky You’re Even Getting a Mactel Version

    #4
    06 May 2006
    09:22 PT
  5. That why we have dumped the mac system and migrated towards those pc’s. We’re tired of the heavy pricing and having a “burning platform”. It’s like shifting from OS9 to next level. Yet again.

    #5
    06 Dec 2006
    11:31 PT

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